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, midatlantic and the midwest. tennessee valley and the carolinas also on ice and any reprieve -- well, could still be days away. frigid air also is making life even tougher for victims of superstorm sandy. many still don't even have basic utilities to heat their homes. national correspondent susan candiotti joins me now from staten island. i understand you spoke to a resident there who still can't get home. what is life like for these people right now? >> reporter: it's tough for everybody, randi. you can imagine it's about 15 degrees outside. with the windchill right now, feels about 5. all this cold is adding to the misery of people still recovering from superstorm sandy back on halloween. you look at staten island it's not hard at all to see houses that are still boarded up, debris everywhere, construction workers trying to get things back in shape. larry gonzalez, here's his story. his home was filled, because of the storm surge, with at least four feet of water. not only that, but a few hundred gallons of heating oil ran through his house. and you can still smell it. you can still see s
, tennessee, to bring attention to the work of the sanitation workers, those that were not receiving adequate wages and not being treated fairly. he was in the midst of planning this poor people's campaign. and i'd like to see more emphasis placed on poverty in our nation. >> reporter: king specifically singles out the african-american and latino communities. >> i know there's you can't alwa-- there's always been a concern about the african-american community not feeling, perhaps, that the issues related to our community have been addressed effectively. and i think there's some room for improvement in that regard. >> reporter: i asked her where gay rights is the next civil rights battle. >> i don't like to speak for him on issues that back then he didn't have an opportunity to speak on. then i'm injecting what he would do. i certainly think that my father -- first and foremost, he saw everybody as important, regardless of how you define yourself in whatever category you fit in, your person hood. and he felt that everybody deserves dignity and respect. >> reporter: king is encouraging folks to
-atlantic, and the midwest. the tennessee valley and the carolinas are also on ice. any reprieve is still days away. frigid air also making life tougher for victims of superstorm sandy. many still don't have even the basic utilities to heat their home since the storm struck. susan candiotti is joining us from staten island. you spoke with a resident there who still can't go home. is that a problem for many? i mean, what is life like for these people now? >> reporter: it is a problem for people here on staten island. you see that even now, a few months after superstorm sandy hit, there is still demolition work going on, removing debris. a lot of people, as you said, are still living in their homes without the basic necessities. some of them simply don't want to leave. they want to stay put among their own belongings. there are places that can get help while they're waiting repairs to begin. larry gonzalez has a problem at his house because he believes it should be demolished and is in an argument with the city that thinks it can be repaired. fema and the like. heating oil poured into the house when a storm
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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